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This pamphlet titled "Anti-Privatisation Forum goes to Durban" was produced by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) for the World Conference against Racism (WCAR) held in Durban in September 2001. The APF's first large scale mobilisation was centred on the WCAR. With very few resources, the APF mobilised hundreds of its activists and community members to go down to Durban by train and join up with the thousands of other South African and international activists and organisations who gathered outside the Conference for a mass march and the occupying of an alternative space separate from the formal Conference to oppose what was seen as both the Conference's and the ANC-government's effective whitewashing of the entrenched and lived legacies of racism. For the APF specifically, direct connections were made to the agenda of privatisation and associated lack of democratic participation and control of the majority. While the WCAR mobilisation was not without its problems, it marked the APF's public intention to engage in larger-scale direct mass action and to link the struggles of South African poor communities with a more macro-international critique and opposition to the character of neoliberal capitalism. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

The first newsletter of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) was published in September 2000. Not long after its formation, the APF decided that it needed to have a public ‘voice’ in the form of a regular newsletter in order to record and publicise its views/positions, various community and other struggles as well as provide a forum for activist opinion. This was the first four page newsletter produced by the APF’s media sub-committee in September 2000 under the name ‘APF Monitor’ – with the main features being coverage of the electricity struggles in Soweto and the City of Johannesburg’s pro-privatisation IGOLI2002 plan. As the APF grew, so too did the size/length of the newsletter as well as the number of copies printed. Over the ten years of the APF’s existence the newsletter (always produced by the media sub-committee) came out on average, twice a year with the average number of copies for each edition being in the region of 2-3000. The name eventually changed to ‘Struggle Continues” as the 16 page August 2006 edition shows (this particular edition providing good coverage of the various elements of the APF’s approach to and struggles around education - see B10.2. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This picture of graffiti done by members of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) community affiliate in Orange Farm appeared in October 2003 in The Star under the title "Are you listening?" The graffiti on the side of a shack captures the anger and frustration felt by so many poor communities at the lack of socio-economic development (basic services) since the fall of apartheid. It is a profound statement of desire and resistance, a message that as long as there is no retribution of socio-economic opportunity and greater equality, there will always be class conflict. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This advertisement by Eskom appeared in the Sowetan of August 18, 2003, and subsequently became the face of a nationwide campaign. This was in direct response to the initiation, by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) and its Soweto community affiliates of a campaign of reconnecting people's electricity after they had been cut off by ESKOM and/or the local government authorities. The advertisement plays on the traditional fear of snakes as evil and implicitly also, the practice of killing snakes when found. After the advert came out ESKOM along with the coercive forces of the state cracked down heavily on anyone associated with reconnections. It is crucial to point out that since the campaign (Operation Khanyisa) began, no person from the APF or it affiliates has ever been injured or died as a result of the reconnections, which were carried out by trained activists. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This newspaper clipping titled "Down the wire for delivery: Orange Farm demo turns ugly as protesters clash with police" appeared in The Star in September 2006. The picture accompanying the article is arguably one of the most emotive symbols of post-apartheid community protest over a lack of basic services. Attempting to flee the indiscriminate firing of rubber bullets by police, this unidentified Orange Farm resident screams in pain after being caught up in razor wire that the police had erected next to the Golden Highway, which residents, under the organisation of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) affiliate in the area, blocked. This particular protest - using the tactic of blockading a main road in order to draw attention - went on for several days, with numerous residents being shot and injured. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This newspaper clipping is from the Sunday Independent of September 15, 2002 titled "Guard dies in shootout with hostel residents". This picture tells the story of a violent confrontation between residents of Kwa-Masiza hostel in Sebokeng and the notorious 'Red Ants' (so called for their red overalls) - employed by the private security firm (Wozani Security) by the City of Johannesburg to carry out forced evictions. The hostel residents were being organised by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) and its affiliates in the area and had been fighting numerous attempts to evict them using legal means as well as regular mobilisation. It is important to note that while the APF did not (in this case) and has never advocated offensive violence, it did stand for the principle of community self-defence. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This article titled "Hear our voices" appeared in the Sunday Star of July 12, 2008. The community of Kliptown in Soweto holds a special place in South Africa's liberation history - it was the site of the 'Congress of the People' gathering in the 1950s that led to the adoption of the Freedom Charter and also a place where Nelson Mandela hid from the apartheid forces. And yet, Kliptown has remained - in the post-apartheid period - one of the poorest and least serviced communities with a severe lack of housing and basic services (where the bucket system of sanitation continues). Most of the community struggles that have occurred have been led by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) community affiliate Kliptown Concerned Residents. This picture and brief article relate to the ongoing contradictions of Kliptown, where a multi-million 'Freedom Square' has been constructed side-by-side with the grinding poverty of shack dwellers. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This public statement titled 'Mass struggle is the only road' appeared in "Khanya: a journal for activists", no. 2 December 2002. After the hugely successful mass march on the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) led by the Social Movements Indaba (SMI) of which the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) was the main driver, and also involving the Landless People's Movement (LPM), the SMI issued this public statement. It provides a succinct overview of the views and demands of the SMI in relation to the WSSD and importantly, commits the SMI (and thus the APF) to embrace mass struggle as its main strategic component. This public statement was not only crucial in shaping the overall political-ideological and organisational content and character of the APF for the remainder of its existence, but in many ways it marked the APF's strategic rejection of more institutionalised, inside-the-system politics. Not surprisingly, in the immediate years that followed the WSSD the APF and SMI constituent members became the target of intensified ANC and government derision and attack. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This newspaper clipping titled "Plakkers: Ons sal die wereld omkeer" appeared in the Beeld of August 10, 2007. Here, the youth burning tyres become yet again, as in the apartheid era, the symbol of community protest against broken promises and government indifference. In this case, the protest organised by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) community affiliates in the Vaal region, was over long-delayed promises of proper housing and basic services in the informal settlement on Dunusa, Sebokeng along with anger over corrupt local councillors. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This picture appeared in This Day of October 6, 2004 titled "Police use stun grenades to disperse protesters" and symbolises the standard response of the state to the vast majority of protest actions that were initiated by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) and its community affiliates. Here, a Phiri (Soweto) senior citizen is being man-handled/arrested by police during a protest over prepaid water meters - a protest that saw several arrests and detentions. As the accompanying artciles makes clear, residents engage in such 'illegal' protests as a direct result of the failure of representative and institutional democracy. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This newspaper clipping is from the Sunday Independent of September 15, 2002 titled "Red Alert". This picture tells the story of a violent confrontation between residents of Kwa-Masiza hostel in Sebokeng and the notorious 'Red Ants' (so called for their red overalls) - employed by the private security firm (Wozani Security) by the City of Johannesburg to carry out forced evictions. The hostel residents were being organised by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) and its affiliates in the area and had been fighting numerous attempts to evict them using legal means as well as regular mobilisation. It is important to note that while the APF did not (in this case) and has never advocated offensive violence, it did stand for the principle of community self-defence. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This article, titled "Residents up in arms over Eskom's planned tariff hikes" appeared in The Star of April 24, 2008. This story speaks to one of the successes of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF), which was to take issues that seemingly were only of concern to anti-privatisation organisations and the poor, to a wider range of people/communities. One such issue/struggle was around the general increase in electricity tariffs in the late 2000s where the APF, in struggle with organisations like Earthlife, were able to effectively mobilise and generate action that linked this to larger issues of public energy needs and environmental concerns. The spaces opened up by such initiatives and struggles, continue to expand democratic voice and impact. IIncluded in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

Not long after its formation, the APF decided that it needed to have a public ‘voice’ in the form of a regular newsletter in order to record and publicise its views/positions, various community and other struggles as well as provide a forum for activist opinion. This was the first four page newsletter produced by the APF’s media sub-committee in September 2000 under the name ‘APF Monitor’ – with the main features being coverage of the electricity struggles in Soweto and the City of Johannesburg’s pro-privatisation IGOLI2002 plan - see B10.1. As the APF grew, so too did the size/length of the newsletter as well as the number of copies printed. Over the ten years of the APF’s existence the newsletter (always produced by the media sub-committee) came out on average, twice a year with the average number of copies for each edition being in the region of 2-3000. The name eventually changed to ‘Struggle Continues” as the 16 page August 2006 edition shows (this particular edition providing good coverage of the various elements of the APF’s approach to and struggles around education. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This publication is a report on the Anti-Privatisation Forum project, titled 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)' and was launched at Museum Africa, Johannesburg in March 2012. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This newspaper clipping is from the 'Mail & Guardian' (M&G) of August 16, 2002, titled "We'll take Sandton! - summit protestors". This was a front page story in the lead-up to the mass march on the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) which took place on 31 August, 2002 and in which the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) was centrally involved. The picture of Comrade Florence Nkwashu, a leading APF and Soweto Electricity Crisis Committee (SECC) activist was taken at a rally of the Social Movements Indaba (a collection of movements, NGOs and activists formed before the WSSD) as part of a range of activities in the run-up to the march. As it turned out, between 20 000-25 000 people marched from Alexandra to Sandton under the banner of the Social Movements United. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) Memorandum of Association, as adopted by the APF Annual General Meeting in March 2006. During its first two years of existence, the APF was organised as a loose collection of activists and various political, worker/union, community and non-governmental organisations. However, once community organisations began to become numerically dominant within the APF it was agreed that the APF needed to have a more formalised democratic structure, leadership and rules of operation. Further, because the APF began to apply for donor funding, there was the need for a formal document of association. The 'Memorandum of Understanding' which was drawn up in late 2002 became the APF's de facto Constitution until a revised and expanded version - later to be renamed as the APF's Constitution - was formally adopted in 2006. Further discussions and amendments were undertaken during the next two years as a result of the growth and experience of the APF until a final Constitution was adopted in 2007. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This code of condict was drawn up by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) in 2007. Even though the APF drew up its first draft Constitution in 2004 (subsequently finalised and formally adopted in 2007), one of the missing elements was a ‘Code of Conduct’ for its own members/activists. Being a largely open membership movement without strict membership ‘rules’ (even though the APF did have an extensive set of policies covering various areas of organisational life), the APF soon found itself confronting a range of difficult challenges associated with the personal and political conduct of a growing number of organisational affiliates, political groupings and individual activist members. More specifically, as a result of a series of personal, political and organisational-financial conflicts and tensions within the APF, a majority within the APF felt that the organisation required a formal ‘Code of Conduct’ in order to guide, regulate and provide for disciplinary action against transgressors. This was eventually adopted by the APF Annual General Meeting in 2007. Although this ‘Code’ was employed in numerous disciplinary cases including in the extremely difficult and very public expulsion of several APF activists in 2009 over rape charges, the APF always struggled with upholding and enforcing all of its contents. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This document on expulsions and suspensions was drawn up by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) in 2009. Even though the APF drew up its first draft Constitution in 2004 (subsequently finalised and formally adopted in 2007), one of the missing elements was a ‘Code of Conduct’ for its own members/activists. Being a largely open membership movement without strict membership ‘rules’ (even though the APF did have an extensive set of policies covering various areas of organisational life), the APF soon found itself confronting a range of difficult challenges associated with the personal and political conduct of a growing number of organisational affiliates, political groupings and individual activist members. More specifically, as a result of a series of personal, political and organisational-financial conflicts and tensions within the APF, a majority within the APF felt that the organisation required a formal ‘Code of Conduct’ in order to guide, regulate and provide for disciplinary action against transgressors. This was eventually adopted by the APF Annual General Meeting in 2007. Although the ‘Code’ was employed in numerous disciplinary cases including in the extremely difficult and very public expulsion of several APF activists in 2009 over rape charges, the APF always struggled with upholding and enforcing all of its contents. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) pamphlet became the APF's standard (explanatory) hand-out to communities, activists and other organisations. Over the years, thousands were printed and also sent electronically around the country, region and globe. In simple language (the pamphlet was also translated and produced in at least three of South Africa's indigenous languages) it briefly explains the APF's history, organisational and political-ideological character and key foci/struggles. Although the APF went through many organisational changes, intense political-ideological debates as well as strategic-tactical shifts, its core purpose and character - as captured in this small pamphlet - remained remarkably consistent. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

The first national elections to be held after the formation of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) were in 2004. These provided an opportunity for the APF to consider and debate its own approach to electoral politics, representative and participatory democracy in general as well as the 2005 national elections in particular, especially in the light of the fact that some communities and APF activists/supporters had been calling for the APF to stand as a political party in the national elections. After intense discussion for many months, the vast majority of the APF community affiliates and activists agreed that the APF would not itself stand and that the APF's call would be for people not to vote for the African National Congress (ANC) or any other parties in Parliament, but to use the elections as a means to broaden and deepen community struggles and an alternative political and organisational vision. The result was the drawing up of this platform which was spread-published far and wide and which also informed the APF's approach to the next national elections in 2009. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This booklet on rights was produced by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) with the help of the Freedom of Expression Institute (FXI) in 2006. Almost from its inception, the APF and its community affiliates found themselves in the ‘firing line’ when it came to the law. This was not only a result of the APF’s commitment to mass direct action whether in the form of marches, pickets, demonstrations, water/electricity reconnections but to the conscious criminalisation of protest by the state authorities as well as political encouragement from the ANC and government officials to treat the APF and its activists as some sort of state enemy who needed to be confronted with the ‘full force of the law’. The resultant hundreds of arrests, lengthy detentions, excessively high bail amounts and drawn out court cases on trumped-up charges involving APF activists meant that from an early stage the APF spent a great deal of time/energy and limited financial resources on legal defence. Through the work of the APF legal sub-committee, funds were specifically raised for legal defence, useful working relationships established with various progressive lawyers (although there was always a shortage of lawyers willing to take up the APF’s so-called ‘criminal cases’) and legal defence solidarity provided to others social movements and community organisations outside the APF. By 2006 it was felt that the APF needed to produce a pocket-sized ‘rights booklet’ for its members to carry so that each activist would know exactly what rights they had specific respect of the Gatherings Act and arrest procedures etc. when confronted/arrested. With the help of the Freedom of Expression Institute, this booklet was produced and thousands of copies distributed both within the APF and to other community organisations. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is the final Constitution adopted by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) in 2007. During its first two years of existence, the APF was organised as a loose collection of activists and various political, worker/union, community and non-governmental organisations. However, once community organisations began to become numerically dominant within the APF it was agreed that the APF needed to have a more formalised democratic structure, leadership and rules of operation. Further, because the APF began to apply for donor funding, there was the need for a formal document of association. The 'Memorandum of Understanding' which was drawn up in late 2002 became the APF's de facto Constitution until a revised and expanded version - later to be renamed as the APF's Constitution - was formally adopted in 2006. Further discussions and amendments were undertaken during the next two years as a result of the growth and experience of the APF until a final Constitution was adopted in 2007. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

After years of water cut-offs, Johannesburg Water began its 'Operation Gcin'amanzi' ('Operation Conserve Water') in Phiri (Soweto) in 2002, which saw the forcible installation of prepaid water meters against residents wishes. In response, the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) formed the Coalition against Water Privatisation (CAWP) to enjoin a broader battle against the installation of prepaid meters throughout 2003-2004. The City of Johannesburg (COJ) alongside the South African Police Service (SAPS), hired private security and the Prosecutor's Office deployed massive resources to crush this opposition and by 2004 had collectively succeeded in effectively stemming the resistance through a combination of brute force, large-scale arrests and detention as well as legal intimidation through high bail fees and drawn out cases on trumped up charges, etc. As a result, Phiri residents opted to open a constitutional rights legal challenge against the prepaid meters and for increased amounts of 'free basic water' with the COJ and the Department of Water Affairs as the main respondents. The case, which began to be put together with the assistance of the Freedom of Expression Institute (FXI) and the Centre for Applied Legal Studies in 2004 became known as the Mazibuko case after the name of the first applicant (of five Phiri residents acting as applicants), Lindiwe Mazibuko. By 2006, the founding affidavit was ready and the case was registered in the Johannesburg High Court. In 2008 the High Court ruled in favour of the applicants, but this was immediately appealed by the COJ to the Supreme Court of Appeals (SCA). The SCA ruling in early 2009 satisfied neither party and the case was then taken to the Constitutional Court which ruled against the applicants in late 2009 as seen in this document. Although the case - which attracted huge national and global attention - was legally lost, the years-long battle framed by this case forced many changes in the City of Johannesburg's and national water policies and placed the issue of water privatisation in general and prepaid meters in particular on the national and international agenda. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This pamphlet was produced by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) in support of the Congress of South African Trade Union's (COSATU's) anti-privatisation strike in 2002. After both original founding member-organisations - the COSATU unions SAMWU and NEHAWU - as well as other ANC-aligned organisations left the APF, the relationship between the APF and COSATU became increasingly strained. Despite COSATU's illegally evicting the APF from its original offices in COSATU house and several of its leaders encouraging non-cooperation with APF and its struggles, the APF continued to provide whatever practical solidarity and support to COSATU and affiliated union strikes and worker struggles it could manage. This flyer, produced in the lead-up to COSATU's 2002 anti-privatisation strike, shows how the APF appealed to COSATU and its unions to link up with and support community struggles as part of a broader and more united worker/community anti-privatisation front. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is the founding declaration of the Coalition against Water Privatisation (CAWP). As one of the key campaign pillars of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) since its formation, the struggle against the privatisation of water was taken up in communities early in the APF's history. Once the City of Johannesburg (COJ) along with other municipalities across the country began to implement full cost recovery resulting in mass water cut-offs and the installation of prepaid water meters, the APF felt it necessary to try and broaden the organisational character and public appeal of these struggles by including other movements, organisation and activists outside the APF. As a result, the APF initiated the formation of the CAWP in 2003. It was CAWP which then led and organised a range of water-related struggles in the Gauteng province, with specific focus on Orange Farm and Phiri (Soweto) and the fight against prepaid meters. CAWP initiated the Mazibuko constitutional rights legal case, became founder a founder member of the Africa Water Network and carried out a range of direct actions, research projects, educational initiatives as well as solidarity actions with other communities across South Africa. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This founding declaration of the the Coalition against Xenophobia (CAX) was drawn up in 2008. After the widespread and violent attacks on immigrants in 2008, the majority of which took place in the Gauteng Province, the APF together with a range of other social movements, community organisations, NGOs and immigrant associations, formed the Coalition against Xenophobia (CAX). Over a period of several months, CAX organised a mass march (over 5000 people) through inner-city Johannesburg, helped provide legal and material assistance to victims of the attacks, conducted educational workshops in communities and engaged in a ‘Shut Down Lindela’ campaign (Lindela being South Africa’s main ‘detention centre’ for ‘illegal immigrants’ prior to deportation). Here is the founding Declaration of CAX, an important statement that seeks to harness human commonality out of the mirrored cesspit of national chauvinism, Afro-phobia and a society deeply marked by its past and ongoing repression. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This Final HIV/AIDS Research Report was produced by the Anti-Privatisation Forum's (APF's) research sub-committee in 2006 on the prevalence and impact of HIV/AIDS in Phiri (Soweto) and the Sol Plaatjie informal settlement on the West Rand. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This Local Government Elections Platform was produced and released by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) in early 2005. Following on the 2004 national elections, the APF was soon confronted by the challenge of fashioning a strategic and tactical approach to the 2005 local government elections. This proved to be a more difficult task given that local government represents the most immediate institutional manifestation of democracy and popular representation at the community level and many of the struggles of the APF and its community affiliates were directed towards local government officials, councillors and institutions. This platform, formally adopted and released in early 2005 after months of workshops, discussion and research, represents arguably the most comprehensive statement of any post-apartheid social movement on the questions of local democracy, people's power, representative institutionalism as well as the problems and demands around all the most central political and socio-economic issues facing poor communities. On the tactical front, the APF once again decided not to run APF candidates, but agreed that community affiliates could make their own choices about running candidates for local government at the ward and proportional representation levels. In the 2005 (and subsequent 2010 local government elections) a small number of APF community affiliates chose to do just that; with a handful being successful in winning seats. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

At the start of 2002, the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) established a dedicated research sub-committee to carry out participatory research training activities involving community members on key issues and campaigns. After the first research project involving prepaid water meters in Orange Farm, titled 'Nothing for Mahala', the sub-committee proceeded to undertake and produce two reports in 2006; this one on prepaid meters in Phiri (Soweto) and the other on the prevalence and impact of HIV/AIDS in Phiri and the Sol Platjie informal settlement on the West Rand. Although the APF did not have the resources to produce thousands of copies of these reports, they were published and distributed fairly widely in both hard copy and electronic formats to community members, academics, researchers and other organisations. The PPM research report provided important material for the ensuing Phiri-based constitutional rights legal case on water and prepaid meters. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This Johannesburg anti-eviction camapign flyer was produced in 2003. Some of the earliest community-based struggles of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) centred around housing issues both within the inner-city of Johannesburg as well as within the East Rand region. As part of these struggles, in 2000 the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) helped initiate and then supported the Johannebsurg Inner-City Anti-Eviction campaign which sought to simultaneously advocate for pro-poor housing and provision of basic services as well as resist evictions of poor tenants by the City of Johannesburg (COJ). It was this foundation that laid the basis for what was to become a spirited, consistent and multi-faceted struggle for housing rights (and later linked to anti-xenophobia struggles) in the inner-city taken up by the successor to the APF's campaign in the form of the independent Inner City Resource Centre. This 2003 flyer tells part of the story of those struggles. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

After years of water cut-offs, Johannesburg Water began its 'Operation Gcin'amanzi' ('Operation Conserve Water') in Phiri (Soweto) in 2002, which saw the forcible installation of prepaid water meters against residents wishes. In response, the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) formed the Coalition against Water Privatisation (CAWP) to enjoin a broader battle against the installation of prepaid meters throughout 2003-2004. The City of Johannesburg (COJ) alongside the South African Police Service (SAPS), hired private security and the Prosecutor's Office deployed massive resources to crush this opposition and by 2004 had collectively succeeded in effectively stemming the resistance through a combination of brute force, large-scale arrests and detention as well as legal intimidation through high bail fees and drawn out cases on trumped up charges, etc. As a result, Phiri residents opted to open a constitutional rights legal challenge against the prepaid meters and for increased amounts of 'free basic water' with the COJ and the Department of Water Affairs as the main respondents. The case, which began to be put together with the assistance of the Freedom of Expression Institute (FXI) and the Centre for Applied Legal Studies in 2004 became known as the Mazibuko case after the name of the first applicant (of five Phiri residents acting as applicants), Lindiwe Mazibuko. By 2006, this founding affidavit was ready and the case was registered in the Johannesburg High Court. In 2008 the High Court ruled in favour of the applicants, but this was immediately appealed by the COJ to the Supreme Court of Appeals (SCA). The SCA ruling in early 2009 satisfied neither party and the case was then taken to the Constitutional Court which ruled against the applicants in late 2009. Although the case - which attracted huge national and global attention - was legally lost, the years-long battle framed by this case forced many changes in the City of Johannesburg's and national water policies and placed the issue of water privatisation in general and prepaid meters in particular on the national and international agenda. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

The Soweto Electricity Crisis Committee (SECC) was one of the founder community member organisations of the APF. Its success in mobilising residents of Soweto in opposition to the privatisation of electricity through ‘Operation Khanyisa’ (‘Operation Turn On’) – which directly reconnected residents who had been cut off and by-passed pre-paid meters – and the resultant publicity was a key component of the APF’s early campaigns/struggles and organisational visibility. In an action that eventually received national and global attention, SECC/APF members descended on the house of the Johannesburg Mayor and proceeded to cut off his electricity. The 87 activists subsequently arrested and charged then had to endure over a year of court proceedings (the court eventually finding them not guilty on all charges) – this pamphlet speaks to that battle. In ensuing years, the SECC and APF continued the battle around electricity with particular focus on prepaid meters (see B3.1.2) – a battle that spread to, and become popularised in, most all poor communities in Gauteng and indeed, across South Africa. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This pamphlet was produced by the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) in support of the Shoprite-Checkers strike in 2006. After both original founding member-organisations - the COSATU unions SAMWU and NEHAWU - as well as other ANC-aligned organisations left the APF, the relationship between the APF and COSATU became increasingly strained. Despite COSATU's illegally evicting the APF from its original offices in COSATU house and several of its leaders encouraging non-cooperation with APF and its struggles, the APF continued to provide whatever practical solidarity and support to COSATU and affiliated union strikes and worker struggles it could manage. This flyer from 2006 gives confirmation of the APF’s ongoing practical solidarity to striking workers (in this case, the longest post-apartheid strike ever by workers in the retail sector) and continued appeal for cross-organisational linkages and support. Despite these and many more other such practical and political efforts by the APF, the leadership of COSATU and most of its unions largely remained hostile to the APF, although this was not always the case with unions like SAMWU and SACCAWU and more rank-and-file union branch members. Additionally though, within the APF itself there was ongoing and intense debate and disagreement about the character and content of the APF’s approach to COSATU, divisions that were most often between members of political groupings within the APF and members of some of the APF’s community affiliates. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

In June 2010, South Africa hosted the Soccer World Cup. By the time this mega-showpiece took place the South African government had spent almost R35 billion of public monies on hosting the event, most of which went towards building/renovating stadiums and roads. At the same time the various city authorities removed hundreds of homeless people and banned informal seller/hawkers from making a living in and around the various stadia. The APF, alongside a few other social movements, community organisations and hawkers associations conducted a series of educational and protest events around the World Cup in the months before it started; doing so in a generally difficult environment due to the popularity of soccer and the massive nationalist/patriotic propaganda emanating from the ANC and government. The pamphlet here was produced and widely distributed during these activities. Subsequently, the APF along with the Johannesburg Hawkers Association organised a march on ‘Soccer City’ (the main World Cup stadium in Johannesburg) for the opening day. However, the Police and City authorities refused ‘permission’ and conducted a virulent crackdown on the day of the march, resulting in far fewer marchers and with the march having to take place several kilometres away from the stadium. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This document titled "Platform of the Anti-Privatisation Forum" was the Anti-Privatisation Forum's (APF's) first attempt to enunciate and explain its core raison d'etre, demands and objectives. This platform was adopted, and then amended by the APF's main democratic body at that stage in its organisational development - the APF Council - at a time when the APF still had some Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) and independent unions, the SACP Johannesburg branch and other ANC-aligned organisations as members. As such, its dominant character and language reflects a less ideologically-laden politics and does not specifically mention or criticise the ANC and the government itself as the main forces behind the privatisation agenda. When these member organisations left the APF (all by 2002), the APF's political-ideological platform began to reflect a much more independent and critical stance towards the ANC and government. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This report on the Kliptown struggle was drawn up by Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) affiliates in 2007. From the early 2000s, the predominantly shack settlements of Kliptown and Thembalihle (both located on the south side of Soweto) began to organise themselves to struggle for basic services and housing. Besides consistent engagement with whatever institutional avenues/mechanisms were available (e.g. the City of Johannesburg (COJ), local councillors, ward committees, etc.) many subsequent battles were fought over the succeeding years in these communities with police as a result of demonstrations and marches led by the two community organisations (both APF affiliates) - the Kliptown Concerned Residents and the Thembalihle Crisis Committee. The respective struggles intensified again in 2007 which this report details. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This report on the Thembalihle struggle was drawn up by Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) in 2007. From the early 2000s, the predominantly shack settlements of Kliptown and Thembalihle (both located on the south side of Soweto) began to organise themselves to struggle for basic services and housing. Besides consistent engagement with whatever institutional avenues/mechanisms were available (e.g. the City of Johannesburg (COJ), local councillors, ward committees, etc.) many subsequent battles were fought over the succeeding years in these communities with police as a result of demonstrations and marches led by the two community organisations (both APF affiliates) - the Kliptown Concerned Residents and the Thembalihle Crisis Committee. The respective struggles intensified again in 2007 which this report details. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

As part of its internationalist activities within the Social Movements Indaba (SMI), the APF initiated and organised - in conjunction with the Zimbabwean civil society group ‘Crisis in Zimbabwe’ – an ‘observer mission’ to Zimbabwe (to the cities of Harare and Bulawayo) of five community activists from various movements belonging to the SMI. The group’s mission in Zimbabwe was to observe political and other conditions in the country in the lead-up to the 2005 national elections in light of the long-running violence and intimidation by the Mugabe regime against opposition forces. This report summarises the mission’s observations during their stay. Subsequently in 2006, the APF – through the SMI and again in conjunction with ‘Crisis in Zimbabwe’ – organised another mission of four movement activists to Zimbabwe to observe and report on the impact of the Mugabe regime’s mass destruction of homes under ‘Operation Murambatsvina’ (‘Operation Restore Order’). It was visits such as these that went a long way in forging a progressive (if at times contested), anti-xenophobic and internationalist politics within South African social movements and making practical linkages of people across national borders. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This pamphlet was produced in 2005 by the SAMANCOR Retrenched Workers Crisis Committee (SRWCC), one of the earliest community affliates of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF). The SRWCC, from Sebokeng, was established by workers retrenched from the industrial conglomerate, SAMANCOR, due to illnesses resulting from manganese poisoning. Starting in 2002, the APF worked tirelessly with the SRWCC, which had effectively been abandoned by the union to which the workers had belonged, NUMSA, to demand proper recognition of the wokers illnesses and adequate compensation by SAMANCOR. Over the years, while many SRWCC members were dying as a result of their illnesses, the struggles for justice gradually yielded some positive results for the workers and their families. However, due to an almost complete lack of support, attention and political will from government the struggle of those ex-SAMANCOR workers who still survive continues. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

The Soweto Electricity Crisis Committee (SECC) was one of the founder community member organisations of the Anti-Privatisation Forum(APF). Its success in mobilising residents of Soweto in opposition to the privatisation of electricity through ‘Operation Khanyisa’ (‘Operation Turn On’) – which directly reconnected residents who had been cut off and by-passed pre-paid meters – and the resultant publicity was a key component of the APF’s early campaigns/struggles and organisational visibility. In an action that eventually received national and global attention, SECC/APF members descended on the house of the Johannesburg Mayor and proceeded to cut off his electricity. The 87 activists subsequently arrested and charged then had to endure over a year of court proceedings (the court eventually finding them not guilty on all charges). In ensuing years, the SECC and APF continued the battle around electricity with particular focus on pre-paid meters as seen in this pamphlet – a battle that spread to, and become popularised in, most all poor communities in Gauteng and indeed, across South Africa. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This document was produced by the Social Movements Indaba (SMI) in 2007. Since helping form the SMI) in 2002, and subsequently becoming the main driving force behind it in succeeding years, the APF pushed hard for an internationalist outlook and approach from South African social movements. As part of this, the SMI participated actively in almost every World Social Forum (WSF) and then also the associated continental and regional off-shoots (African Social Forum and Southern Africa Social Forum). When the WSF came to the African continent – Nairobi, Kenya in 2007 – the SMI (alongside Khanya College) organised a large delegation of social movement activists to travel by bus from Johannesburg to Nairobi. Once there the SMI delegation became one of the most public, active and militant anti-capitalist voices within the WSF. This platform, which was presented to the WSF plenary, expresses the collective views and positions of the SMI on both the South African and global political economy and represents the best of the internationalist traditions of South Africa’s broad working class movements. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

After years of water cut-offs, Johannesburg Water began its 'Operation Gcin'amanzi' ('Operation Conserve Water') in Phiri (Soweto) in 2002, which saw the forcible installation of prepaid water meters against residents wishes. In response, the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) formed the Coalition against Water Privatisation (CAWP) to enjoin a broader battle against the installation of prepaid meters throughout 2003-2004. The City of Johannesburg (COJ) alongside the South African Police Service (SAPS), hired private security and the Prosecutor's Office deployed massive resources to crush this opposition and by 2004 had collectively succeeded in effectively stemming the resistance through a combination of brute force, large-scale arrests and detention as well as legal intimidation through high bail fees and drawn out cases on trumped up charges, etc. As a result, Phiri residents opted to open a constitutional rights legal challenge against the prepaid meters and for increased amounts of 'free basic water' with the COJ and the Department of Water Affairs as the main respondents. The case, which began to be put together with the assistance of the Freedom of Expression Institute (FXI) and the Centre for Applied Legal Studies in 2004 became known as the Mazibuko case after the name of the first applicant (of five Phiri residents acting as applicants), Lindiwe Mazibuko. By 2006, the founding affidavit was ready and the case was registered in the Johannesburg High Court. In 2008 the High Court ruled in favour of the applicants as seen in this document, but this was immediately appealed by the COJ to the Supreme Court of Appeals (SCA). The SCA ruling in early 2009 satisfied neither party and the case was then taken to the Constitutional Court which ruled against the applicants in late 2009. Although the case - which attracted huge national and global attention - was legally lost, the years-long battle framed by this case forced many changes in the City of Johannesburg's and national water policies and placed the issue of water privatisation in general and prepaid meters in particular on the national and international agenda. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

After years of water cut-offs, Johannesburg Water began its 'Operation Gcin'amanzi' ('Operation Conserve Water') in Phiri (Soweto) in 2002, which saw the forcible installation of prepaid water meters against residents wishes. In response, the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) formed the Coalition against Water Privatisation (CAWP) to enjoin a broader battle against the installation of prepaid meters throughout 2003-2004. The City of Johannesburg (COJ) alongside the South African Police Service (SAPS), hired private security and the Prosecutor's Office deployed massive resources to crush this opposition and by 2004 had collectively succeeded in effectively stemming the resistance through a combination of brute force, large-scale arrests and detention as well as legal intimidation through high bail fees and drawn out cases on trumped up charges, etc. As a result, Phiri residents opted to open a constitutional rights legal challenge against the prepaid meters and for increased amounts of 'free basic water' with the COJ and the Department of Water Affairs as the main respondents. The case, which began to be put together with the assistance of the Freedom of Expression Institute (FXI) and the Centre for Applied Legal Studies in 2004 became known as the Mazibuko case after the name of the first applicant (of five Phiri residents acting as applicants), Lindiwe Mazibuko. By 2006, the founding affidavit, together with this supplementary founding affidavit was ready and the case was registered in the Johannesburg High Court. In 2008 the High Court ruled in favour of the applicants, but this was immediately appealed by the COJ to the Supreme Court of Appeals (SCA). The SCA ruling in early 2009 satisfied neither party and the case was then taken to the Constitutional Court which ruled against the applicants in late 2009. Although the case - which attracted huge national and global attention - was legally lost, the years-long battle framed by this case forced many changes in the City of Johannesburg's and national water policies and placed the issue of water privatisation in general and prepaid meters in particular on the national and international agenda. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Abram Mokete, conducted by Dale McKinley on 17.11.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Ahmed Veriava, conducted by Dale McKinley on 19.02.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Bheki Xaba, conducted by Dale McKinley on 19.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Claire Ceruti, conducted by Dale McKinley on 23.02.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Olga Pickover in 2010. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Dale McKinley, conducted by Ahmed Veriava on 1.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of this interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Ellen Chauke, conducted by Dale McKinley on 20.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Florence Kwashu, conducted by Dale McKinley on 22.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Florencia Belvedere, conducted by Dale McKinley on 17.02.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Olga Pickover in 2010. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Jabulani Molobela, conducted by Dale McKinley on 22.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Johannes Mokonyane, conducted by Dale McKinley on 22.11.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with John Appolis, conducted by Dale McKinley on 17.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Olga Pickover in 2010. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with John Appolis, conducted by Dale McKinley on 17.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Olga Pickover in 2010. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Kgothatso Mola, conducted by Dale McKinley on 9.02.2011 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Lawrence Ntuli, conducted by Dale McKinley on 20.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Lawrence Ntuli, conducted by Dale McKinley on 20.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Lucien van der Walt, conducted by Dale McKinley on 23.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Mammy Tladi, conducted by Dale McKinley on 30.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Mashao Chauke, conducted by Dale McKinley on 19.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Meshack Tladi, conducted by Dale McKinley on 6.04.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Meshack Tladi, conducted by Dale McKinley on 6.04.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Mondli Hlatshwayo, conducted by Dale McKinley on 19.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Mondli Hlatshwayo, conducted by Dale McKinley on 19.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Nicolas Dieltiens, conducted by Dale McKinley and Ahmed Veriava on 15.02.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Nina Benjamin, conducted by Dale McKinley on 9.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Olga Pickover in 2010. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Phineas Malapela, conducted by Dale McKinley on 9.02.2011 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Portia Mosia, conducted by Dale McKinley on 28.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Prishani Naidoo, conducted by Dale McKinley on 19.02.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Richard Mokolo, conducted by Dale McKinley on 18.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Sehlaphi Sibanda, conducted by Dale McKinley on 8.04.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. This interview was transcribed by Olga Pickover in 2010. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Sehlaphi Sibanda, conducted by Dale McKinley on 8.04.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. This interview was transcribed by Olga Pickover in 2010. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Silumko Radebe, conducted by Dale McKinley on 23.02.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Silumko Radebe, conducted by Dale McKinley on 23.02.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Simon Mthembu, conducted by Dale McKinley on 17.11.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Siphiwe Segodi, conducted by Dale McKinley on 23.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Sipho Jantjie, conducted by Dale McKinley on 17.11.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Sipho Magudulela, conducted by Dale McKinley on 30.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Sithembiso Nhlapo, conducted by Dale McKinley on 25.04.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Solomon Makhanya, conducted by Dale McKinley on 9.02.2011 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Teboho Mashota, conducted by Dale McKinley on 15.05.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Thabo Molefe, conducted by Dale McKinley on 23.08.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. The interview was transcribed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Trevor Ngwane, conducted by Dale McKinley on 23.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

This is a transcript of the interview with Virginia Setshedi, conducted by Dale McKinley on 30.03.2010 for the South African History Archive (SAHA) as part of the Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF) oral history project. Transcribing of the interview was started by Olga Pickover in 2010 and completed by Sehlaphi Sibanda in 2011. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

The document constitutes the Anti-Privatisation Forum's (APF's) full application for funding to War on Want (WOW). From its inception in 2000 until 2002, the APF received no formal donor/outside funding, relying on occasional project donations from NGOs as well as from its own activists and member groupings. The first attempt to secure formal organisational donor funding in 2001 was unsuccessful, but in 2002 an application was made to the British charity, Comic Relief, through the offices of a progressive London-based NGO, War on Want (WOW) for a multi-year grant (covering years 2002-2005) to cover basic organisational, operational and project related costs. This application was successful and from 2003, allowed the APF to secure funds for opening and staffing its own office, carrying out various educational activities, supporting the activities and mobilisations of its community affiliates, providing some legal support as well as engaging in APF specific actions and solidarity initiatives. Despite the fact that the funds received were directly from public donations (to Comic Relief) and that War on Want always approached the relationship with the APF (in both this first funding phase and the second phase from 2005-2008) as a mutual partnership, the issue of donor funding and its associated impacts on the APF were always an intense topic for discussion and debate within its ranks. Included in SAHA virtual exhibition - 'Transition's Child: The Anti-Privatisation Forum (APF)'

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